Archive for March, 2013

Congratulations to Mary vanHarn

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Congratulations to one of our lab techs, Mary vanHarn.  Many of you may remember Mary.  For some time, she worked up at our front desk in the afternoon while she was attempting to get her lab off the ground.  Now her Dental Lab, James River Crown & Bridge has hit the big time.  In the March 2013 issue of Richmond Magazine, Mary’s lab was written up for not only making beautiful teeth, but for the artful Dental Tattoos she has been painting within the porcelain glaze.  Years ago, Mary started doing these little designs for some of our office staff including flowers, hearts, and lady bugs.  Dr. Freeman’s Mother even requested a cute little flower on her molar crown so she could have the proud distinction of having gotten a tattoo (although not the conventional type).  Pick up Richmond Magazine and check out Mary’s work on page 79.  Chances are, if you crown was done by our office in the last 10 years, Mary might have been your porcelain artist.

From Richmond Magazine:

For dental ceramist Mary vanHarn, your teeth are tiny blank canvasses waiting for her artistic touch.  “I’ve helped a lot of people improve their smiles,” she says of the custom paintings she applies to crowns and bridges for $15 to $30.  The owner of James River Crown and Bridge uses a colored glaze to paint butterflies, footballs, flowers and more on the dental work that she makes in her Henrico dental laboratory.

 

Who Makes You Smile?
Dr. Mark Freeman & Associates
3290 Church Road
Henrico, VA  23233
804-270-3080

Goochland Man Working to Achieve More Independence

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Harry East wants to be able to get around better.  So he can find a job.  East, 36 a double amputee who only has the use of his left arm (he’s naturally right-handed), is still dealing with the aftermath of a nightmarish sequence of events that began almost 10 years ago, when what began as a flu-like series of symptoms landed him in the hospital fighting for his life against MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus).  A stroke and a case of endocarditis (inflammation of the inner layer of the heart) added insult to injury for the young man, who was on intensive care and spent two months in MCV.

But he left the hospital determined to rehabilitate himself.  He spent seven weeks in 2012 at Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center in Fishersville and now volunteers at the Goochland Administration Building every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, where he mans the information desk at the building entrance from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.  “I direct traffic,” said East, who goes by his initials H.F., helping visitors find the right office when they come in.  He also uses his computer skills to assist several departments with spreadsheets and other tasks.

Enrolled at J. Sargeant Reynolds in architectural and industrial design, East is looking for paying work, he said.  “Right nos I’m almost kind of bored,” he said during and interview last week at the administration building.  But he feels okay and has adapted to his disabilities.  “I can do pretty much anything with my left hand,” he said.  And that’s why he hopes to be able to take a special driving course through Brant’s Driving School, the organization that brought a special Honda van to Woodrow Wilson last March.  East said he drove it for two hours.

Having such a van to use and knowing how to drive it would make all the difference in his job search, he said.  but money is an obstacle.  The driving course would cost about $8,000 and the special van, equipped with a joy stick and other devices so he could drive it, could run to more than $100,000.  “We’re trying to see if DRS (the Department of Rehabilitative Services) will pay for the driving school,” said East but says the going has been slow working with the agency.

Occasionally he gets “down in the dumps,” he says when he thinks his goal of being able to travel on his own may not happen.  But meanwhile the Sisters of Ruth women’s group at Forest Grove Christian Church, where East and his family are members, have raised about $9,000.  They’ve got a long way to go but are planning fund raising activities in the near future to help East achieve his goal of independence.  for more information, contact Sisters of Ruth treasurer Bernice Perkins at 804-556-3207 or write her at 4062 Broad Street Road, Gum Spring, VA 23065.

 

Originally Printed in the Goochland Gazette on February 7, 2013.

 

 

Who Makes You Smile?
Dr. Mark Freeman & Associates
3290 Church Road
Henrico, VA  23233
804-270-3080

 

Prevent Decay With Dental Sealants

Friday, March 1st, 2013

In addition to good oral hygiene, including brushing and flossing, there are other ways to prevent tooth decay.  Dental sealants can help protect your children’s teeth by sealing them off from decay causing bacteria.  Made of a liquid plastic, dental sealants are applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth to protect tooth enamel from decay causing bacteria and acids.  These sealants fit perfectly into the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) of teeth, protecting them from 80% of all tooth decay.

While brushing and flossing help to remove food particles and plaque from the smooth surfaces of teeth, toothbrush bristles often cannot reach into teeth’s depressions and grooves.  However, sealants can protect these areas and prevent food and bacteria from building up.  The risk of decay decreases significantly after sealant are applied, and as long as the sealant remains intact, the tooth surface will be protected from decay.  Sealants hold up well under the force of normal chewing and usually last 2 to 7 years before a reapplication is needed.  During your child’s regular dental visits, Dr. Freeman or Dr. Scott will check the condition of sealants and reapply them when necessary.

Decay can begin early in life, so children should receive sealants on permanent molars as soon as they erupt, which is around age 6 for the first molars and age 12 for second molars.  Sealants can protect adult teeth too!  Ask Dr. Freeman and Dr. Scott whether sealants would be beneficial for you teeth.  Dental Insurance usually will pay for sealants on children and teenager’s permanent molars.  If sealant is suggested for other teeth, our front desk can tell you whether or not the cost will be covered, but in most cases, the out of pocket cost of a sealant is less expensive than the co-payment incurred when having a cavity repaired.  Be sure to check with your Dental Insurance Company about your spicific plan, as coverage may vary.

Who Makes You Smile?

Dr. Mark Freeman & Associates

3290 Church Road

Henrico, VA    23233

804.270.3080

 

 



 

Dental Website Design by Dentist Design, Inc.